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Archive for January, 2013

Do Omega 3’s that Protect Against Heart Disease Negatively Affect Prostate? [VIDEO]

January 29, 2013

From what we know, eating a diet full of processed foods and not enough fresh, unprocessed foods is unhealthy and can negatively affect our bodies. This study, however, revealed this might not be the case when it comes to prostate cancer risk.

In this HealthDay TV video, we learn about a study about the impact of omega-3’s, nutrients commonly found in fish, on the heart and prostate health. View the video below to reveal the results. Visit Life Line Screening’s YouTube channel to learn more about healthy lifestyles. For those without video capability, the text is provided below.

Omega 3s that Protect Against Heart Disease May Negatively Affect Prostate?

Here is the audio text to the video:

“A type of fat that can protect the heart may not be such a good guy elsewhere in the body. Omega-3 fatty acids have earned a good reputation. Found in fish like salmon, omega-3’s can help prevent heart disease. On the other hand, trans-fatty acids, which are often found in processed foods, have a reputation for being unhealthy for the heart.

In a new study, researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center checked out how these nutrients may affect men’s risk of prostate cancer. Their results were more than a little surprising.

They included about 3,400 middle-aged and older men. Roughly half of the men had prostate cancer and the others didn’t have the disease. The researchers took blood samples to measure their levels of omega-3’s and trans-fatty acids. Men with high levels of the omega-3, known as DHA, actually had a greater risk of aggressive prostate cancer.

On the other hand, as the men’s levels of trans-fatty acids went up, their risk of serious prostate cancer went down. Despite these findings, the lead researchers said that the benefits of eating fish to protect against heart disease outweigh the possible risk of prostate cancer.

I’m Dr. Cindy Haines of HealthDay TV with the news the doctors are reading, health news that matters to you.”




Immune System Health, Walking and Stroke Risk, Memory Loss that Isn’t Alzheimer’s

January 25, 2013

Looking for the latest health news? Start with the weekly news roundups from Life Line Screening. Below, we examine recent headlines featuring ten things that weaken your immune system, walking’s link to women’s stroke risk and causes of memory loss that aren’t Alzheimer’s disease.

 

10 Things that Weaken Your Immune System

Your immune system needs to be strong to fight off illnesses like the cold and flu, especially this time of year. One surefire way to get sick this winter is take part in things that weaken your immune system. ABC News recently released a list of the worst things for your immune system, and you’d be surprised what made the list.

The first way to hurt your immune system is to avoid social interaction. Studies have shown a connection between friendship and a stronger immune system. Second on the list is lack of sleep. By scrimping on sleep every day, your immune system sees reduced numbers of killer cells that fight germs, making it weaker. Read other things that can harm your immune system from ABC News now.

 

Study: Walking Lowers Women’s Stroke Risk

Study: Walking Lowers Women’s Stroke Risk | Life Line ScreeningSince obesity and lack of physical activity are already known as risk factors for conditions like heart disease, diabetes, stroke and more, it’s not surprising that one study found a definitive link between weekly walks and decreased stroke risk in women.

According to the Huffington Post, both men and women who participated in the study were told to report on their weekly physical activity along with their medical history, diet and lifestyles. Over the average 12 years of follow-up that occurred, researchers found that walking for at least three-and-a-half hours a week was linked to lower stroke risk for women when compared to those who didn’t walk. There was no link found between the men’s stroke risk and walking.

Preventive health screenings are another way to stay on top of your health and identify a health problem before it becomes catastrophic. Learn more about the different types of health screenings from Life Line Screening today.

 

Causes of Memory Loss that Aren’t Alzheimer’s

Memory loss happens to almost everyone. Although sometimes memory loss combined with other warning signs can point to Alzheimer’s disease, not all memory loss is caused by the development of this brain disease.

According to Yahoo! Health, a few causes of memory loss that aren’t Alzheimer’s include chronic stress, depression, certain medications, a malfunctioning thyroid, heavy alcohol consumption and more. All of these causes of memory loss may seem alarming, but are not necessarily associated with a major brain disease. If you have memory problems, read the full list of causes of common memory loss to learn more.

 

What’s Trending on LifeLongHealth.com

Want to get in on the discussions going on right now at LifeLongHealth.com? Check out what’s trending now:

Do You Dream and Remember Your Dream?  When you dream, do you remember them after you wake up? Do you write down your dreams? Share your experiences now.

Alcohol: Strictly Open Discussion Both red wine and vodka can raise good cholesterol levels by 30 percent. Join the discussion here.

Functional Decline: Let’s Discuss Functional decline is when elderly adults lose the ability to care for themselves over time. What are you doing to keep your brain sharp?




VIDEO: Tips to Help You Start a Healthier Lifestyle

January 22, 2013

Many of the New Year’s Resolutions made involve some type of health goal, like a healthier diet, losing weight, exercising more, quitting smoking or others. Some people set themselves up for failure by making goals that are too lofty and out of reach. This year, don’t be one of these people.

Beginning a healthier lifestyle doesn’t have to be hard and these tips from HealthDay TV can help make it easy. Learn the three steps you should take to make achieving your health goals all the more possible.

View the video below to discover how you can set yourself up for success this year. Visit Life Line Screening’s YouTube channel to learn more about healthy lifestyles. For those without video capability, the text is provided below.

Tips to Help You Begin Living a Healthier Lifestyle

Here is the audio text to the video:

“Doctors often tell people to lose weight, eat healthier and stop smoking. Now let’s talk about how you can actually do these things.

Hi, I’m Dr. Cindy Haines, host of HealthDay TV. Living a healthier lifestyle can be hard, but change isn’t so tough if you go about it the right way. Try these three steps:

One: Learn why you want to change. We all want to be healthy, but that’s kind of a vague hope that may not inspire you to change your life. Write down what being in good health would help you do, like feel better, be more fit, or live long enough to see your grandkids grow up. If you need inspiration for living a healthier life, review your list.

Two: Figure out how ready you are. Are you ready to make healthy changes now? If not, might you be ready in a few months? People at different stages of readiness need different motivations to take action. If you aren’t quite willing to change yet, think about what you would need to do to become more ready.

Three: Break big goals into smaller ones. Losing 50 pounds is like climbing a mountain. If this is your goal, think instead about starting with a ten pound loss. Make mini goals that will help you reach it, like starting to walk around your block, then later jogging around it, then entering a 5k race in your community.

I’m Dr. Cindy Haines of HealthDay TV with the news the doctors are reading, health news that matters to you.”




Flu Fact or Fiction, Foods for a Strong Heart, New Diabetes Drug

January 18, 2013

Looking for the latest health news? Start with the weekly news roundups from Life Line Screening. Below, we examine recent headlines featuring the most common flu myths, best and worst foods for heart health and the FDA’s opinion of a new type 2 diabetes drug.

 

12 Flu Myths Busted 

12 Flu Myths Busted  | Life Line Screening BlogIf you’ve been keeping up with the news lately, you know how serious the flu is this year. With that in mind, how much of what you know about the flu is really true or is a myth? ABC News released an article addressing the most common flu myths and why they are just that: myths.

What are some of these so-called myths? To name a few: the flu vaccine can give you the flu, the flu vaccine is dangerous, young, healthy people don’t need to get a flu vaccine because the flu is only dangerous for elderly or infants, and more. See why these and other common flu myths are far from truthful and why you shouldn’t listen when you hear such accusations by reading the full ABC News article.

 

Best and Worst Foods for Heart Health

When you have an unhealthy heart, you can have an unhealthy body all around. Many risk factors like obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and more can put you at greater risk for heart disease or stroke. The good news is that certain foods can help keep your heart healthy and strong by reducing these risk factors.

Recently, U.S. News ranked the best and worst diets for heart health. These 29 diets, as described by the Huffington Post, have their own way of reducing cardiovascular disease risk and lowering risk factors. The Mediterranean Diet, for example, puts a heavy emphasis on fresh produce, monounsaturated fats and protein, with low amounts of red meat and other foods that have been seen to be unhealthy for the heart.

A heart screening is another way to keep your heart healthy and stay knowledgeable about your risk for heart problems. Life Line Screening offers affordable health screenings that can help identify a possible threat from heart problems before they get worse. Learn more today.

 

FDA Panel Backs Approval of New Diabetes Drug

A new diabetes drug has been making headlines as of late. According to the New York Times, a panel of advisers to the Food and Drug Administration has backed the approval of a new drug for type 2 diabetes. The drug, called canagliflozin, is made by Johnson & Johnson. The medication lowers blood sugar by causing it to be excreted in urine.

Although the panel recommended approval of the drug, they were somewhat concerned about its possible side effects. Studies show that the drug may temporarily increase a person’s risk for stroke or heart attack.

Risk factors for diabetes include obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, family history, advanced age, high triglycerides and more. If you think you might be at risk for diabetes, learn more about the type 2 diabetes screenings offered by Life Line Screening today.

 

What’s Trending on LifeLongHealth.com

Want to get in on the discussions going on right now at LifeLongHealth.com? Check out what’s trending now:

Alcohol: Strictly Open Discussion Both red wine and vodka can raise good cholesterol levels by 30 percent. Join the discussion here.

Do You Dream and Remember Your Dream?  When you dream, do you remember them after you wake up? Do you write down your dreams? Join the discussion here.

Hair Loss  What are the different causes and reasons for hair loss? Share your experience with us here.




Friday Roundup: Ways to Prevent Colds and Flu, 2012 Medical Breakthroughs & More

January 11, 2013

Looking for the latest health news? Start with the weekly news roundups from Life Line Screening. Below, we examine recent headlines featuring the best ways to prevent colds and flu, how one study shows memory trouble starts at 50 and memorable medical breakthroughs from 2012.

 

15 Best Ways to Ward Off a Cold or Flu 

15 Best Ways to Ward Off a Cold or FluThis time of year is often referred to as cold and flu season, because the colder temperatures make us more susceptible to sore throats, fever, runny nose and more. ABC News tells us that on average, adult Americans get three colds per year, each lasting a week or two. On top of that, 5 to 20 percent of adults will get the flu this year.

So how can you make an effort to prevent yourself from succumbing to a cold or flu this year? Take your health into your own hands by doing a few things known to help prevent these illnesses, such as frequent hand washing, meditation, eating more garlic, exercising, getting vaccinated and eating fewer sweets, among others. Read the full list from ABC News.

Life Line Screening urges all individuals at risk for disease to take control of their health by practicing preventive measures, such as health screenings. These screenings can help identify a serious health condition before it reaches catastrophic levels. Learn more about preventive health screenings today.

 

Study: Trouble Remembering Object Names Starts at Age 50

As we get older, we notice small changes in our ability to remember things, such as someone’s name. One study from researchers in Belgium found that as early as age 50, memory of the names of common objects doesn’t come as quickly when compared to younger people.

In the study, people in their 50s weren’t able to name objects as quickly as participants in their 20s and 30s, but once they did remember the name, the people in their 50s were as accurate as the younger group. People in their 60s and 70s, however, were not as accurate with remembering object names.

“We don’t know yet why this happens,” said study researcher Clemence Verhaegen in a Fox News article. “[I]t may indicate changes in our language abilities only or it may be caused by physical factors that have nothing to do with language. More studies are needed to reveal what it really going on.”

 

Top Medical Breakthroughs of 2012

A lot happened in 2012, and even though researchers didn’t discover a magic pill to make us all look and feel younger, they did make many notable discoveries. For instance, one paralyzed woman successfully became the first person to ever move her prosthetic limb with brainpower.

Other outstanding medical insights from 2012 include a milestone met when laws made the majority of U.S. cities smoke free, new genetic discoveries made in association with autism, Alzheimer’s and mental illness, and one early study found promise for a lung cancer vaccine. Read more about these medical breakthroughs from Health.com.

 

What’s Trending on LifeLongHealth.com

Want to get in on the discussions going on right now at LifeLongHealth.com? Check out what’s trending now:

Flu Season: What Are You Doing to Prevent the Flu? Flu season is here, and we’re all trying to avoid it. What are your tips for preventing the flu?

Do You Dream and Remember Your Dream? When you dream, do you remember them after you wake up? Do you write down your dreams? Join the discussion here.

Stuck in the Middle…Sandwich Generation? Are you a caregiver and a parent being pulled in two different directions? Is it making you overwhelmed? Share your experiences here.




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