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Archive for March, 2013

Friday Roundup: Foods to Slow Aging, Diabetes Risk and Standing, and More

March 29, 2013

Are you looking to stay up-to-date on the latest health news? Start with the weekly news roundups from Life Line Screening. March is National Nutrition Month so this news roundup features recent headlines focused on diets and nutrition. Headlines include foods to slow aging, diabetes risk and standing, and information on the growing threat of Alzheimer’s disease.

 

Foods that Slow Down Aging

We’re all getting older. There’s nothing we can do about that. What we can do is slow down the appearance of aging by changing our bodies from the outside and inside.

Research has shown that Omega-3’s, also known as the fatty acids in foods like fish, can help lower risk for health conditions like heart disease, depression, arthritis and more. New results show that they may also help slow down the aging process by promoting reduced destruction of the part of the DNA that keeps the aging process slow.

“The DNA parts that were affected were the ends of chromosomes, called telomeres,” said Dr. Martha Belury, Ph.D., R.D., in the Grandparents.com article. “What we think happens in aging is the telomeres get shortened. This is indicative of wear and tear on the cells, which can lead to cell death.”

Read more about the study here: http://www.grandparents.com/health-and-wellbeing/anti-aging/anti-aging-foods

 

Study: Reduce Diabetes Risk by Standing Up

Although exercising is a great way to stay active and lower your risk of developing several dangerous health conditions like heart disease, stroke and diabetes, one recent study shows you can actually reduce your diabetes risk by simply swapping time you spend sitting with time you spend standing and walking around.

According to the Medical News Today article, people at risk for type 2 diabetes are frequently told to take part in at least 150 minutes per week of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. The study published in Diabetologia, however, reveals that more importance should simply be placed on reducing sedentary time (time spent sitting or moving very little) with any type of movement, like standing and walking.

Ready the full study results here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/257111.php

 

The Growing Threat of Alzheimer’s Disease

According to a new report on global death and disease, Alzheimer’s disease is the fastest growing health threat in the U.S. The report reveals that the number of people predicted to develop the memory disease will triple with the next 40 years, amounting to a total of 13.8 million Americans with Alzheimer’s disease.

The report also provides insight into the major reasons for health threats to Americans, revealing that Americans are most likely to die from diseases caused by their own unhealthy lifestyles, like using tobacco or overeating. Changing lifestyles to lower major disease risk factors like quitting smoking, eating a healthy diet and exercising regularly can dramatically lower the number of Americans succumbing to preventable diseases.

See more information on the report findings here: http://vitals.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/03/05/17196908-alzheimers-fastest-growing-health-threat-report-says?lite

 

What’s Trending on LifeLongHealth.com

You can get involved with the health and nutrition discussions going on right now at LifeLongHealth.com. Here’s what’s trending:

  • Sweeteners Are there any natural sweeteners out there that aren’t bad for your health? Which ones do you prefer? Share with us.
  • 100 Days of Real Food Have you ever considered eating only “real” food for a certain length of time by cutting out unhealthy sugars and fats? Please join the discussion here.
  • What Suggestion Would You Give a Company to Promote Wellness? Wellness and prevention are two central themes that are taking center stage lately. Do you have any suggestions for companies looking to get involved? Share them.



VIDEO: The Risks of High Salt Intake

March 27, 2013

March is National Nutrition Month, and brings with it a growing awareness of the importance of a healthy, nutritious diet. When it comes to the foods and drinks we put into our bodies, moderation is key. Too much of anything, like too much sugar, too much fat, or too much sodium, can negatively impact the body by increasing risk for high blood pressure, obesity, diabetes and more.

In this Life Line Screening video, we explore a new study from the University of Miami School of Medicine that put the well-known issue of too-much salt intake to the test. View the video to discover the results of the study and find out why they might matter to you and your health.

For more information on proactive and affordable ways to stay healthy, explore the preventive health screenings offered by Life Line Screening. Visit Life Line Screening’s YouTube channel to learn more about healthy lifestyles. For those without video capability, the text is provided below.

 

Half-Minute Health-Helpers: The Risks of High Salt Intake

Here is the audio text to the video:

“Most people already know that high levels of salt are not good for the human body and normally lead to a higher blood pressure over time. Now a new study led by the University of Miami School of Medicine seems to support the claim that there is a strong link between high salt intake and conditions such as heart disease and stroke – not just high blood pressure.

And just like sugar, hidden salt is everywhere, so read your labels to keep salt off your tables.”




Friday Roundup: Sleep and Exercise, Belly Fat and Osteoporosis, and More

March 22, 2013

Are you looking to stay up-to-date on the latest health news? Start with the weekly news roundups from Life Line Screening. March is National Nutrition Month so this news roundup features recent headlines focused on diets and nutrition. Headlines include sleeping and exercise, the link between belly fat and osteoporosis, and common nutrition myths busted.

 

Having Trouble Sleeping? Exercise Might Help

Between those who take the time to exercise and those who don’t, one group is sleeping better at night, according to one recent study.

The research results from the 2013 Sleep in America poll of 1,000 adults between 23 and 60 years of age found that the people who exercised got more quality sleep than those who did not. The actual amount of sleep the participants got every night was the same for both groups, however those who exercised found they were sleeping better and waking up feeling more rested each night.

“Compared to people who don’t exercise, vigorous exercisers were much less likely to have insomnia-related symptoms, such as having difficulty falling asleep or waking up too early and not being able to get back to sleep,” the HealthDay News article states.

Read the full study findings here: http://news.health.com/2013/03/04/exercise-leads-to-better-sleep-poll/

 

The Link Between Belly Fat and Osteoporosis

Too much of anything can be bad for your health. New research has found that when drinking beer or consuming an unhealthy diet leads to a “beer belly” (also known as belly fat), it can potentially lead to osteoporosis.

The study from the North American Society for Radiology shows obesity in the midsection among men can be associated with osteoporosis. This is due to the added stress excess weight in the midsection can put on the spine, bones and joints, increasing risk of bone weakening and fracturing.

Although men tend to have a lower risk of developing osteoporosis than women, this study shows that men with excess weight in their trunks are at an increased risk compared to men without this added midsection weight.

To ready the full story on the study, click here: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/02/27/beer-bellies-in-men-linked-to-osteoporosis/

 

Nutrition Myths Busted

We’re nearing the end of National Nutrition Month, but it doesn’t mean the focus on nutrition has to end. In fact, we can always keep learning about healthy nutrition to promote a healthy life.

In this Yahoo! Health article, common nutrition myths are explored and dispelled. For example, are you under the impression that all carbohydrates are bad for you? Contrary to what you’ve been told, your body needs carbohydrates for energy. However, not all carbs are the same. Certain carbs like white flour and added sugars can actually hurt your health if consumed too heavily. Stick to refined carbohydrates like whole grains so your body gets the healthy energy it needs.

To read the full list of common nutrition myths and their true answers, view this link: http://health.yahoo.net/experts/drmao/5-nutrition-myths-dispelled

 

What’s Trending on LifeLongHealth.com

You can get involved with the health and nutrition discussions going on right now at LifeLongHealth.com. Here’s what’s trending:

  • Sweeteners Are there any natural sweeteners out there that aren’t bad for your health? Which ones do you prefer? Share with us.
  • What Suggestion Would You Give a Company to Promote Wellness? Wellness and prevention are two central themes that are taking center stage lately. Do you have any suggestions for companies looking to get involved? Share them.
  • 100 Days of Real Food Have you ever considered eating only “real” food for a certain length of time by cutting out unhealthy sugars and fats? Please join the discussion here.



Friday Roundup: Best Foods to Lower Alzheimer’s Risk, Downside to Nighttime Snacks & More

March 15, 2013

Although it may seem to be out of your control, there are things you can do now to keep your brain active and sharp while lowering your risk of cognitive disorders like Alzheimer’s or dementia. In fact, certain foods have been proven to aid in brain health and reduce risk of Alzheimer’s.

Some of these foods include a variety of nuts (walnuts, almonds, pecans, hazelnuts), salmon and other fatty fish like mackerel and sardines, berries (strawberries, blueberries, cranberries), spinach, other leafy greens and even coffee. The key is to consume a diet that contains healthy fats rather than trans fats and sugar.

Read the full article on the best foods for your brain here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/23/alzheimers-prevention_n_2734550.html

 

The Downside to Snacking at Night

New findings from a study published in the journal Current Biology found that the body’s ability to regular blood sugar changes throughout the day. This impact on metabolism leads to an increase in fat production at night and less fat production during the day.

Previous studies found that night-shift workers are more prone to obesity and diabetes. This new study backs up those findings by pointing out the body’s increased fat production during the day.

“Disrupting your biological clock leads to a disruption of metabolism such that there’s more of a tendency to put on fat” even with the same amount of calorie intake, said co-author of the study Carl Johnson in the news article.

Read the full study results here: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/02/25/why-snacking-at-night-is-bad-for/

 

Sleep Deprivation and Your Genes

You’ve probably heard over and over how important quality sleep is to your health. Did you know that lack of sleep can actually have a negative impact on your genes?

A new study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that regular sleep deprivation can disrupt the activity of your genes and even affect functions like metabolism. These disruptions can lead to long-term effects on the body.

“If people regularly restrict their sleep, it is possible that the disruption that we see…could have an impact over time that ultimately determines their health outcomes as they age in later life,” said study co-author Simon Archer in the news article.

Read more here: http://healthyliving.msn.com/health-wellness/aging/sleep-deprivation-may-disrupt-your-genes

 

What’s Trending on LifeLongHealth.com

You can get involved with the health and nutrition discussions going on right now at LifeLongHealth.com. Here’s what’s trending:




VIDEO: Coffee and Alzheimer’s Disease

March 13, 2013

Getting older doesn’t have to mean a foggier mind. Although there is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease, researchers are learning more and more about preventive measures we can all take to keep our brains sharp and lower our risk for cognitive disorders like Alzheimer’s.

One study has shown that caffeine may contribute to keeping our brains functioning properly. In this Life Line Screening video, learn about the results that showed coffee’s effect on people with the beginnings of Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive impairments.

Visit Life Line Screening’s YouTube channel to learn more about healthy lifestyles. For those without video capability, the text is provided below.

 

Half-Minute Health-Helpers: Coffee and Alzheimer’s Disease

Here is the audio text to the video:

“As we’re living longer and longer lives, we all want those extra years to be happy, healthy and productive and not compromised with foggy brain function. An article posted recently on WebMD.com announces a study reporting that three cups of coffee a day can stem the tide against debilitating cognitive conditions in older adults who are already experiencing memory problems.

It’s interesting to note that coffee was the main source of caffeine among people in the study as opposed to soft drinks or teas, which may indicate that there’s also a benefit to the bean, as well. So to help keep your mind sharp, remember to jump on the java.”




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