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Archive for November, 2014

Healthy Recipe: Green Bean Casserole

November 25, 2014

We have a festive recipe that you can whip up just in time for your family’s holiday dinner. Green bean casserole seems to be a staple for the feast, but the original version is packed with sodium, fat and calories. So instead of nixing a classic dish, use this recipe for an updated and lighter version.
 

Green Bean Casserole with Madeira Mushrooms – click here for the full recipe

  • 1 1/2 pounds green beans, trimmed and halved crosswise
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 cups chopped sweet onion
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
  • 8 ounces shiitake mushrooms, stemmed and sliced
  • 1 (8-ounce) package presliced button mushrooms
  • 1/3 cup Madeira wine or dry sherry
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup fat-free, lower-sodium chicken broth
  • 1 cup (about 2 ounces) canned fried onions (such as French’s)
  • 1/2 cup (2 ounces) grated fresh Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese

If you aren’t a fan of mushrooms, feel free to substitute in peppers, olives or other vegetables. Also keep in mind that if you prefer to have softer green beans, you can leave the casserole in the oven for a longer period of time.

Vegetables have always been known to benefit any diet. Maintaining a regular intake of vegetables can very well reduce the risk of stroke, cancer, heart diseases, and diabetes. For more information on preventive health care, visit lifelinescreening.com.




Healthy Recipe: Broccoli and Cheese Soup

November 18, 2014

A piping hot bowl of soup is the ultimate comfort food during the winter months. While nothing can beat cuddling up with a warm bowl on a chilly night, soups aren’t only game for the winter months. This healthy recipe for broccoli and cheese soup will become a year long staple.
 

Broccoli and Cheese Soup (click here to access the full recipe)

  • 3 cups unsalted chicken stock
  • 1 3/4 cups broccoli florets, coarsely chopped (about 8 ounces)
  • 1 cup diced yellow onion
  • 1/2 cup chopped carrot
  • 3/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 3/4 cup half-and-half
  • 4 ounces shredded reduced-fat extra-sharp cheddar cheese, divided
  • 1/4 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves
  •  

We know you’ll love this delicious soup. Whip up this recipe for a last minute dinner or serve it to friends and family at your next get together. You can’t go wrong with a nice, light dish equipped with heart-healthy, beneficial ingredients.
 
Vegetables have always been known to benefit any diet. Maintaining a regular intake of vegetables can very well reduce the risk of stroke, cancer, heart diseases, and diabetes. For more information on preventive health care, visit lifelinescreening.com.




Ingredient Swaps for Type 2 Diabetes

November 13, 2014

Making a few small changes in your favorite recipes can help transform your favorite meals into a healthier and diabetes-friendly dish. If you have type 2 diabetes, pre-diabetes or are just trying to adopt a healthy diet, here are 10 simple ingredient substitutions that cut fat, sugar and calories, but don’t skimp out on flavor.

Ingredient Swaps

  • Use one-third of the sugar called for in a recipe. Instead of using the whole amount, add in a teaspoon of cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla, or almond extract to replace the sweetness.
  • Instead of using sugar in a recipe, replace it completely with a natural sugar such as Truvia, which is made from the leaves of the stevia plant.
  • Cut back on the total amount of fat in a recipe by up to one-half by substituting olive oil or coconut oil instead of butter. Also, be sure to only use a low-fat cooking spray to coat pans of baking sheets.
  • Replace all of the oil in a baking recipe with pureed fruit like unsweetened applesauce.
  • If you have a recipe that calls for cheese, using those with strong flavors allow you to use less without cutting down on how the dish should taste.
  • Instead of using a whole egg in a recipe with a quarter cup of egg substitute or two egg whites.
  • Substitute almond, soy and low-fat milk for whole milk.
  • When cooking stock and soup, allow them to cool and skim off the fat at the top. If you are using store bought versions, purchase low-sodium or sodium-free options.
  • Only use whole-wheat flour, whole-wheat pasta and brown rice.
  • Work in fresh vegetables whenever you can. Add broccoli to macaroni and cheese, and put garden veggies in pasta sauce. Try to avoid using canned veggies, since they contain high amounts of sodium.

 

 Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

When it comes to type 2 diabetes, the goal is always prevention. With diabetes affecting more than 26 million Americans and quickly growing, it’s more important than ever to know your personal risk factors:

  • Family History
  • Race (African Americans, Hispanics, Pacific Islanders, American Indians, Alaska Natives and Asian Americans are at an increased risk)
  • Being Overweight
  • Physical Inactivity
  • Low HDL cholesterol
  • High blood pressure
  • Abnormal fasting glucose screening results

If you have any of these risk factors, or are above the age of 45, it is recommended that you have a blood glucose screening once every three years.




Help Identify Diabetes Early

November 12, 2014

29.1 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, which is the 7th leading cause of death in the United States. Type 2 Diabetes can be prevented when discovered early and lifestyle changes are made, which is why it is recommended that all adults age 45 and over get screened for diabetes.

To help promote Diabetes Month we are offering 2 Diabetes tests for just $60 with purchase of the Annual 6 for Life Health Assessment ($79).

Includes:

  • Hemoglobin A1c — measures your average blood sugar for the past 2-3 months.
  • C-Reactive Protein (CRP) — measures levels of inflammation that indicate higher diabetes risk.

 

Diabetes Infographic2 (2)

 

Importance of Preventive Health

Since our inception in 1993, we have screened nearly eight million people, and currently screen nearly one million people each year at over 16,000 screening events nationwide. Through this experience, we often identify serious health issues and have helped save thousands of lives. We are dedicated to providing the highest quality preventive screenings at affordable rates.

 

 




Winter Weather and Your Health

November 12, 2014

Winter is just around the corner, so while you’re busy preparing for colder weather, add preventive health screenings to your winter prep checklist. Having high blood pressure puts you at an increased risk for stroke and heart attack, but why get it checked in the winter?

As the weather gets colder, your body reacts to the temperature drop. With lower temperatures, blood vessels become more narrow which forces your blood pressure to rise as it carries blood through a smaller space. High blood pressure then causes damages to the lining of blood vessels which can cause atherosclerosis.

 

Importance of Preventive Health

When it comes to your heart health, early detection is crucial in order to prevent future complications. Preventive health screenings can help you identify and assess your personal risk for serious conditions, with results that you can share with your doctor.

 

Are Health Screenings Right for You?

Dr. Stephen A. Brunton recently wrote an article stressing the importance of health screenings, especially to keep you heart healthy this winter. If you have two or more of these risk factors, we recommend that you schedule a health screening at one of our locations nearest to you.

Family History: No matter how healthy your lifestyle is, if a close family member has suffered from a heart attack, stroke, or cardiovascular disease you have an increased risk.

Smoking: This covers everything from you smoking, or even being around people who smoke. (Inhaling secondhand smoke puts you at risk.)

Not knowing Your Numbers. Having high cholesterol and high blood pressure  raise your risk for several diseases. Not knowing where you currently stand puts you at risk, simply because you could be unaware of a potential problem.

Age. Even if you take your multivitamins, exercise regularly, and are in better shape than you were in your 20s, your age is still a risk factor. Diabetes screening recommendations start age 45 and stroke screenings are recommended for those ages 50+ (or age 40 with risk factors), so just because you “feel” healthy does not mean you aren’t at risk.

Diabetes. Right now, 29.1 million Americans have diabetes, and 86 million have pre-diabetes. Diabetes currently has no cure, but can cause serious complications including eye disease, kidney failure and nerve damage. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services showed that 25% of Americans suffer from multiple chronic conditions, which means that people diagnosed with diabetes are more likely to suffer from atherosclerosis or another condition.

Some of these risk factors, such as increasing age and family history are out of your control, which is where preventive health can play an important role. Regular checkups and screenings are keys to early detection and successful treatment of serious health conditions.

Since our inception in 1993, we have screened nearly eight million people, and currently screen nearly one million people each year at over 16,000 screening events nationwide. Through this experience, we often identify serious health issues and have helped save thousands of lives. We are dedicated to providing the highest quality preventive screenings at affordable rates.




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