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Archive for January, 2015

Healthy Recipe: Almond & Lemon Crusted Fish with Spinach

January 30, 2015

Coating fish with nuts and baking it is an easy, foolproof way to cook it elegantly. And it is especially nice with a mild white fish like cod or halibut. The spinach turns a little yellowy because it’s cooked with the acidic lemon juice, but what you lose in green color is more than made up for in great flavor.
 

Almond & Lemon Crusted Fish with Spinach

  • Zest and juice of 1 lemon, divided
  • 1/2 cup sliced almonds, coarsely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh dill or 1 teaspoon dried
  • 1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 1 1/4 pounds cod (see Tip) or halibut, cut into 4 portions
  • 4 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 2 cloves garlic, slivered
  • 1 pound baby spinach
  • Lemon wedges for garnish

 

 Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F. Coat a rimmed baking sheet with cooking spray.
  2. Combine lemon zest, almonds, dill, 1 tablespoon oil, 1/2 teaspoon salt and pepper in a small bowl. Place fish on the prepared baking sheet and spread each portion with 1 teaspoon mustard. Divide the almond mixture among the portions, pressing it onto the mustard.
  3. Bake the fish until opaque in the center, about 7 to 9 minutes, depending on thickness.
  4. Meanwhile, heat the remaining 2 teaspoons oil in a Dutch oven over medium heat. Add garlic and cook, stirring, until fragrant but not brown, about 30 seconds. Stir in spinach, lemon juice and the remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt; season with pepper. Cook, stirring often, until the spinach is just wilted, 2 to 4 minutes. Cover to keep warm. Serve the fish with the spinach and lemon wedges, if desired.

 

Nutrition Information

Per serving: 249 calories; 13 g fat (1 g sat, 8 g mono); 46 mg cholesterol; 8 g carbohydrates; 0 g added sugars; 28 g protein; 4 g fiber; 496 mg sodium; 1025 mg potassium.

Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin A (184% daily value), Vitamin C (37% dv), Folate (36% dv), Magnesium (35% dv), Potassium (29% dv), Iron (22% dv), Calcium (17% dv)

Carbohydrate Servings: 1/2

Exchanges: 1 vegetable, 3 lean meat, 2 fat

© Meredith Corporation. All rights reserved. Used with permission




5 Ways to Lose Weight Together

January 22, 2015

According to a 2007 study at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, marriage goes hand in hand with weight gain. “In the first five years of marriage, women gained an average of 24 pounds and men gained 30 pounds,” says Penny Gordon-Larsen, Ph.D., a professor of nutrition at UNC and author of the study.

So how to you combat the weight gain? Follow these five tips that will help you and your spouse eat and live healthier together.

1. Be an Active Part of a Healthy Solution

Figure out if there is anything you are doing or can do to help your spouse eat healthier. For example, if your spouse often eats fast food at lunch and you typically pack your lunch, offer to start packing him or her a healthy lunch too.

2. Stock Up on Healthy Foods

Out of sight, out of mind? This may be a good tactic for unhealthy foods. A study led by Brian Wansink, Ph.D., director of Cornell’s Food and Brand Lab, found that people wolf down more than twice as many chocolates when they’re right in front of them compared to when they’re farther away.  If temptation still outweighs these extra barriers, skip buying foods that trigger cravings and buy them or go out for them only on special occasions.

3. Cook Healthy Meals for Each Other

Experiment with new recipes and turn cooking into a fun activity that you both do together.

4. Lead by Example

Several studies have shown that influence from friends and family on eating and physical activity habits has a strong impact on your own health behaviors. So develop and adopt your own healthy habits, and it’s likely that your spouse will too!

5. Plan Healthy Activities to Do Together

In a study published this year in theJournal of Obesity, researchers reported that among participants in a 6-month weight-loss program, those who joined with a friend lost significantly more weight. So instead of watching TV after dinner together, take a quick walk around the neighborhood.

 




A Day in the Life of a Successful Dieter

January 21, 2015

I’m often asked for tips on boosting weight-loss success. While there’s no single answer that works for everyone, focusing on your diet and tuning up your exercise are two key elements for weight loss. Another? Having a plan. Start out the week by planning what healthy meals and exercise you can fit in during the upcoming days. There are also some things you can eat and do at certain times throughout the day to maximize your weight-loss success. Here’s a sample day in the life of a successful dieter:

8 a.m. Eat a Bowl of Oatmeal With Banana and Walnuts.

Science shows that regular breakfast eaters tend to be leaner and that dieters are more successful at losing weight—and keeping it off—when they eat breakfast. But choosing the right breakfast can give an extra boost to your weight loss. Eating “slow-release” carbohydrates, such as oatmeal or bran cereal, three hours before you exercise may help you burn more fat, suggests a recent study in the Journal of Nutrition. Here’s why: slow-release carbohydrates didn’t spike blood sugar as high as eating refined carbohydrates, such as white toast. In turn, insulin levels didn’t spike as high and because insulin plays a role in signaling your body to store fat, having lower levels may help you burn fat.

10 a.m. Grab a Small Nonfat Latte and an Apple.

If having a snack between meals helps to tide you over, make your choices count. Snacks are a great place to fill nutritional gaps. Choose foods that provide calcium and fiber—two nutrients that people often skimp on. The latte and apple do the trick.

11 a.m. Take a Brisk 40-Minute Walk.

Although the recommendation is to get 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise five times a week, research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that women who exercised an extra 10 minutes five days a week were more successful at warding off weight gain as they moved from their twenties and thirties into middle age.

1 p.m. Eat a Big Veggie Salad Topped With Grilled Chicken and a Slice of Whole-Grain Bread.

The formula for a get-skinny lunch that will power you through the afternoon (and banish the need for extra munching) is simple: vegetables, whole-grain bread and lean protein (like chicken, fish, tofu or beans). Why does it work? Making veggies the biggest portion of your lunch will give you a satisfying dose of fiber, the stay-full nutrient, while delivering healthy phytochemicals, vitamins and minerals. The whole grains also add fiber and may help bust belly fat, according to a study in the Journal of Nutrition. The lean protein helps keep you feeling full throughout the afternoon–gram for gram, protein will keep you feeling fuller longer compared to carbohydrates and fat.

4 p.m. Snack On Fresh-Cut Veggies With Hummus…Or Not.

Before having a mid-afternoon snack, take a minute to see if you’re really hungry. If not, forgo the extra calories and wait until dinner. If you are, follow the fiber-plus-protein combo for a snack that will really kick your hunger. Carrots and hummus are a classic combo.

6 p.m. Start Your Meal With a Soup or Salad.

Filling up on fiber- and water-rich foods first can help prevent you from overdoing high-calorie fare later. Research out of Penn State shows that eating a first-course salad can reduce overall calorie intake at a meal by up to 12 percent. And in a study in Appetite, people who started lunch with vegetable soup ended up eating 20 percent less than those who skipped the soup. Try these Soups and Salads to Help You Lose Weight. Whatever you choose for your main meal, try eating it off a smaller plate—it may help you to eat less while not feeling deprived.

8 p.m. Indulge in a Few Squares of Dark Chocolate.

Believe it or not, giving yourself little treats may be the secret to losing weight—for good. Aiming to be “too good” sets you up to fail. Chocolate is a good choice (if you like it!) because chocolate delivers extra health benefits—it contains antioxidants called flavanols that are good for your heart.

© Meredith Corporation. All rights reserved. Used with permission




Healthy Recipe: Smoky Maple-Mustard Salmon

January 20, 2015

It doesn’t get much easier—or more delicious—than this speedy recipe for roast salmon topped with a smoky maple-mustard sauce. The sweetness of the maple balances the tangy mustard; smoked paprika or ground chipotle adds another layer of flavor. Ask at the fish counter to have the salmon cut into four 4-ounce fillets with the skin removed. Serve with roasted green beans and whole-wheat couscous tossed with pecans and chives.
 

Smoky Maple-Mustard Salmon – click here for the full recipe

  • 3 tablespoons whole-grain or Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon pure maple syrup
  • 1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika or ground chipotle pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 4 4-ounce skinless center-cut wild-caught salmon fillets

 

Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Heart Health

 
If you want a healthy heart, be sure to include plenty of fish in your diet. Fish plays a protective role against heart disease and cancer that’s attributed to Omega-3 fish oil, which is found in Alaska salmon. Here are a few health benefits:

  • Protect heart health
  • Reduce risk of sudden death from heart disease
  • Reduce risk of stroke
  • Reduce chance of heart disease in Type 2 Diabetes
  • Essential in infant brain and eye development during pregnancy and infancy
  • Improve blood lipid patterns
  • Improve blood vessel function
  • Improve symptoms of immune and inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, Chrone’s disease and some skin conditions
  • Reduce the risk of some mental disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and depression

 

Protect Your Heart for a Healthy Future

 
At Life Line Screening, we believe that the power of prevention is essential to a long and healthy life, especially when it comes to your heart. We offer a heart disease screening that includes the following:

  • Complete Lipid Panel Screening (High Choelsterol)
  • C-reactive Protein Screening
  • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening
  • Glucose Screening
  • High Blood Pressure Screening

If you have any warning signs or if you know that you have some of the risk factors associated with an increased risk of heart problems, you may want to consider heart disease screening.  If you are unaware of potential risk factors please read the list here.

 




Secret to Looking Younger is a Healthy Heart

January 15, 2015

Keeping your heart healthy can add years to your life, but did you know that it also helps you look younger? When researchers showed people photos of women about 60 years of age, they thought the women with the lowest risk of cardiovascular disease looked two years younger compared to those with a higher risk.

The key to achieving a youthful appearance may be tied to your systolic blood pressure – which is the top number. Researchers think that when your blood pressure is too high, it may impede your skin’s microvascular system, responsible for delivering nutrients and oxygen. When those beneficial elements aren’t delivered optimally, it may strain your skin and possibly diminish that youthful glow. High blood pressure may also be linked to women who looked older because it’s related to other lifestyle factors like stress and lack of exercise, which can be detrimental for your skin.

If you’re blood pressure reads higher than 140/90, which is high, don’t worry just yet, there are plenty of ways you can lower your number. Try eating more potassium-packed fruits and vegetables and healthy fats like nuts and avocados.

Maybe you already know that what you put in your body can affect how it looks on the outside, but the motivation to knock a couple of years off your age may help you pay attention to keeping your blood pressure in a healthy range.

 Need a little more convincing? Other studies have found that women who led heart-healthy lifestyles, less smoking and sunbathing and better healthy-eating habits—had skin that looked younger. Many factors that contribute to looking older, smoking and high blood pressure, are also related to heart disease.
 

Protect Your Heart for a Healthy Future

 
At Life Line Screening, we believe that the power of prevention is essential to a long and healthy life, especially when it comes to your heart. We offer a heart disease screening that includes the following:

  • Complete Lipid Panel Screening (High Choelsterol)
  • C-reactive Protein Screening
  • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening
  • Glucose Screening
  • High Blood Pressure Screening

If you have any warning signs or if you know that you have some of the risk factors associated with an increased risk of heart problems, you may want to consider heart disease screening.  If you are unaware of potential risk factors please read the list here.




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