Get Blog Updates By Email

rss RSS Feed | What is RSS?

Life Line Screening Blog

Timely news, articles, events and more...
from the leaders in health screening.

Check availability and schedule a screening:

Enter a U.S. Zip Code

post_bot

Archive for the ‘Health Awareness’ Category

Taking Care of Your Kidneys

March 4, 2015

More than 26 million Americans currently have chronic kidney disease (when the kidneys can’t properly do their job of cleaning toxins and wastes from the blood), and millions more are at risk of developing it, yet most people don’t realize it. That’s because kidney disease develops very slowly over many years before any symptoms arise. But left untreated, the disease can eventually require people to spend hours hooked up to a dialysis machine or get a kidney transplant. Even mild kidney problems can double a person’s risk of heart attack and stroke, as well as cause anemia and bone disease.

The reason kidney disease has become so widespread today is because of the rise of obesity, type-2 diabetes and high blood pressure which all strain the kidneys.

Another factor is the increasing number of people who take multiple medications, which can overtax the organs. People over age 60 are especially vulnerable both because they tend to take more drugs, and because kidney function normally declines somewhat with age.

To help you rate your risk of kidney disease, the National Kidney Foundation has a quick, online quiz you can take at kidney.org.
 

Get Tested

 
Because kidney disease has no early symptoms, the only way to catch it before it advances is to have a simple blood and urine test by your doctor. So, if you have diabetes, high blood pressure or heart disease, a family history of kidney disease, or are age 60 or older you need to get tested. African, Hispanic, Asian and Indian Americans along with Pacific Islanders are also at increased risk.

If you’re diagnosed with kidney disease you need to know that there’s no cure, but there are steps you can take to help contain the damage, including:

Control your blood pressure: If you have high blood pressure, get it under 130/80. If you need medication to do it, ACE inhibitors and ARBs are good choices because of their proven ability to protect the kidneys.

Control your diabetes: If you have diabetes, keep your blood sugar as close to normal as possible.

Change your diet: This usually means reducing the amount of protein and phosphorus you eat, and cutting back on sodium and possibly potassium. Your doctor can help you determine an appropriate eating plan, or you may want to talk to a dietitian. Also see myfoodcoach.kidney.org where you’ll find lots of kidney friendly recipes and nutrition tips.

Watch your meds: Dozens of commonly used drugs can damage the kidneys, especially when taken in high doses over long periods – most notably NSAIDs like ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin and generic) and naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn and generic). Herbal supplements can also be very dangerous. Talk to your doctor about all the prescription, over-the-counter and herbal products you take to identify potential problems and find alternatives.

Exercise and lose weight: If you’re overweight and inactive, start an aerobic fitness routine (walk, swim, cycle, etc.) that gets your heart pumping. This will help lower your blood pressure, control diabetes and help you lose excess weight all of which will help your kidneys.

Quit smoking: If you smoke, quit. Heart disease becomes a much greater risk to the kidneys if your smoke. Smoking also doubles the rate of progression to end-stage renal failure.

 




Help Out Your Heart

February 27, 2015

Your heart works hard to keep your body working and in motion, so it’s only fair that you help it out along the way. In honor of Heart Month, we’ve put together an with important facts and prevention tips.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for men and women, making prevention extremely important. At Life Line Screening we value the power of prevention, and offer a comprehensive heart disease screening to assess your personal risk.

LLS_Heart Month_Infographic_v2 (2)




Secret to Looking Younger is a Healthy Heart

January 15, 2015

Keeping your heart healthy can add years to your life, but did you know that it also helps you look younger? When researchers showed people photos of women about 60 years of age, they thought the women with the lowest risk of cardiovascular disease looked two years younger compared to those with a higher risk.

The key to achieving a youthful appearance may be tied to your systolic blood pressure – which is the top number. Researchers think that when your blood pressure is too high, it may impede your skin’s microvascular system, responsible for delivering nutrients and oxygen. When those beneficial elements aren’t delivered optimally, it may strain your skin and possibly diminish that youthful glow. High blood pressure may also be linked to women who looked older because it’s related to other lifestyle factors like stress and lack of exercise, which can be detrimental for your skin.

If you’re blood pressure reads higher than 140/90, which is high, don’t worry just yet, there are plenty of ways you can lower your number. Try eating more potassium-packed fruits and vegetables and healthy fats like nuts and avocados.

Maybe you already know that what you put in your body can affect how it looks on the outside, but the motivation to knock a couple of years off your age may help you pay attention to keeping your blood pressure in a healthy range.

 Need a little more convincing? Other studies have found that women who led heart-healthy lifestyles, less smoking and sunbathing and better healthy-eating habits—had skin that looked younger. Many factors that contribute to looking older, smoking and high blood pressure, are also related to heart disease.
 

Protect Your Heart for a Healthy Future

 
At Life Line Screening, we believe that the power of prevention is essential to a long and healthy life, especially when it comes to your heart. We offer a heart disease screening that includes the following:

  • Complete Lipid Panel Screening (High Choelsterol)
  • C-reactive Protein Screening
  • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening
  • Glucose Screening
  • High Blood Pressure Screening

If you have any warning signs or if you know that you have some of the risk factors associated with an increased risk of heart problems, you may want to consider heart disease screening.  If you are unaware of potential risk factors please read the list here.




Heart-Healthy Diet Basics

September 25, 2014

So you want to eat a heart healthy diet? Whether you want to take advantage of preventing heart disease, or are working towards reducing your risk, following a healthy diet and exercise plan are two ways to achieve your health goals.

Here are a few basics to help get you started:

Be Calorie Conscious
Weight control is vital in prevention and treatment of heart disease. Having excess weight makes your heart work harder, leading to increased blood pressure in addition to raising cholesterol and triglyceride levels.

Balance your calorie intake with what you burn, and make sure to get calories from meaningful foods that also provide nutritional value.

Know Which Fats to Eat and Which to Avoid
Monounsaturated Fats: These are plant based and can help lower cholesterol when they replace saturated fat in your diet. Find this in canola, olive and peanut oils, pecans and avocados.

Polyunsaturated Fats: These fats are derived from plants and fish, and can also help to lower cholesterol. Fish like salmon and tuna have omega-3 fatty acids which work to keep the heart healthy, even in small amounts.  Find it in nuts, fatty fish, and sunflower, soybean and sesame oil.

Saturated Fats: Mostly found in animal products, these solid fats raise LDL cholesterol and increase the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Trans Fats: These are processed oils that raise LDL cholesterol and lower HDL “good” cholesterol.

Cut Your Salt Intake
The more sodium you consume, the higher your blood pressure will be, and as blood pressure jumps, so does your risk for heart disease and stroke. Limit your intake to 1,500 milligrams a day.

Go for the Grains
Whole grains that is. Eating 2.5 servings of whole grains per day can lower your risk for heart disease. Having a higher intake of whole grains is also associated with decreased risk for obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol.

 

Focus on What’s Healthy

To fight heart disease, eating an assortment of nutritious foods daily can help lower your risk. In addition to making an effort to follow diet guidelines, taking advantage of preventive health screening options is the next step.

Life Line Screening offers a heart disease screening that includes checking for high cholesterol, elevated C-reactive protein levels, high blood pressure and assess other risk factors. Learn more about our preventive health screenings.




Benefits of Soy Protein for Heart Health

September 18, 2014

Do you eat soy products? If you’re a woman, be sure to include them into your diet for a healthy heart. The key is to start eating soy early in life.

According to research from Wake Forest School of Medicine found that lifelong consumption produces the least atherosclerosis, hardening and narrowing of the arteries.

Most of the protein consumed in the United States comes from animal sources, and contributes to heart disease. Even eating a diet high in soy products early in life, but switching to a Western diet later in life contributes to just as much atherosclerosis as a lifelong Western diet.

In the study, conducted on monkeys, those who were fed soy and those that switched to a soy diet had better cholesterol levels than those who ate animal protein. However, those that ate a lifelong soy diet had a much lower proportion of complicated plaque in their arteries.

While there may be myths saying that soy is dangerous for your heart, soy actually does your heart good. In addition to helping prevent atherosclerosis, soy products can help young adults lower their blood pressure. Whole soy foods have high levels of protein and fiber which can help reduce bad cholesterol.

Where to Find Soy
If you want to incorporate soy into your diet, avoid eating soy burgers and energy bars since they are processed forms of soy. When soy is processed, its nutrients are stripped away.

Instead opt for fresh soy milk, edamame, tofu and fermented soy foods.

 

Other Ways to Protect Your Heart

At Life Line Screening, we believe that the power of prevention is essential to a long and healthy life, especially when it comes to your heart. We offer a heart disease screening that includes the following:

  • Complete Lipid Panel Screening (High Choelsterol)
  • C-reactive Protein Screening
  • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening
  • Glucose Screening
  • High Blood Pressure Screening

If you have any warning signs or if you know that you have some of the risk factors associated with an increased risk of heart problems, you may want to consider heart disease screening.  If you are unaware of potential risk factors please read the list here.

Life Line Screening provides preventive health screenings for heart disease to help those at risk detect problems before they lead to life-threatening consequences. Learning where you stand with your heart health is the best way to work towards a healthier life.




post_bot

Popular Posts

side_bot

Recent Posts

side_bot

Health Topics

side_bot

Connect with Us

  

a
A+ Rating

cancer_re larry cfht