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Posts Tagged ‘diabetes’

Vitamin A Deficiency Linked to Type 2 Diabetes

March 18, 2015

Type 2 diabetes affects over 29 million Americans, according to the American Diabetes Association, and it accounts for almost 95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in the United States.

Type 2 diabetes develops when insulin-producing cells in the body are unable to produce enough insulin, or when any insulin that is produced, fails to work properly.

Although a healthy diet, regular exercise, and medication are often used to treat type 2 diabetes, a new study published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry has found a potential link between vitamin A deficiency and the onset of type 2 diabetes.

Vitamin A

Vitamin A strengthens immunity against infections and aids in the growth of cells, along with helping maintain and improve vision. Vitamin A also boosts beta cell activity. Beta cells produce and secrete insulin, a hormone that regulates levels of glucose in the blood. Research found, significant beta cell loss, resulted in the reduction of insulin production and increased blood glucose levels – key factors involved in development of type 2 diabetes. It is for this reason Dr. Lorraine Gudas, the primary author in the recent study, suggests a lack of the vitamin may play a role in the development of type 2 diabetes. In conclusion, make sure to eat foods high in vitamin A so you do not become vitamin A deficient!

Foods High in Vitamin A

Good sources of vitamin A include cheese, eggs, yogurt, and liver. You can also make sure you have enough vitamin A by including good sources of beta-carotene in your diet. Add a few of these foods to your next grocery list:

  • Sweet potatoes
  • Carrots
  • Spinach
  • Kale
  • Mustard Greens
  • Collard Greens
  • Winter Squash
  • Swiss Chard

 

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

When it comes to type 2 diabetes, the goal is always prevention. With diabetes affecting more than 26 million Americans and quickly growing, it’s more important than ever to know your personal risk factors:

  • Family History
  • Race (African Americans, Hispanics, Pacific Islanders, American Indians, Alaska Natives and Asian Americans are at an increased risk)
  • Being Overweight
  • Physical Inactivity
  • Low HDL cholesterol
  • High blood pressure
  • Abnormal fasting glucose screening results

If you have any of these risk factors, or are above the age of 45, it is recommended that you have a blood glucose screening once every three years.




Dangers of Diabetes: Similarities Between this Disease and HIV/AIDS

December 2, 2014

A new health study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine shows that almost 30% of adults who have diabetes are undiagnosed, which is the same rate as individuals with HIV. Another shocking fact is only 20% of diabetes patients are treated satisfactorily, the same percentage as HIV patients.

While these facts are shocking, researchers found similarities between the management of diabetes and HIV.

To start off, both diabetes and HIV require patients to be proactive in managing their disease. The consequences of not doing so, will result in severe complications.

HIV weakens the immune system, which can lead to patients developing other diseases.

Diabetes, if it is not managed correctly, can lead to kidney, heart and brain problems.
 

Gap in Diabetes Care

 
The problem comes from people who are living with the disease and aren’t diagnosed. Millions of people are living with a disease and are unaware, and more are not taking proper medication, or visiting a doctor.

At Life Line Screening, we provide a preventive health screening for type 2 diabetes to help you assess your own personal risk factor. According to new screening guidelines, everyone over the age of 45 should have a diabetes screening.

Screenings help identify risk early, and results should be shared with your doctor so you can work on a management plan.

Our diabetes screenings are quick and easy, and measure your blood sugar levels after 8 hours of fasting. Here is what our test includes:

• Hemoglobin A1c — measures your average blood sugar for the past 2-3 months.
• C-Reactive Protein (CRP) — measures levels of inflammation that indicate higher diabetes risk.
 

Importance of Preventive Health

 
Since our inception in 1993, we have screened nearly eight million people, and currently screen nearly one million people each year at over 16,000 screening events nationwide. Through this experience, we often identify serious health issues and have helped save thousands of lives. We are dedicated to providing the highest quality preventive screenings at affordable rates.




Ingredient Swaps for Type 2 Diabetes

November 13, 2014

Making a few small changes in your favorite recipes can help transform your favorite meals into a healthier and diabetes-friendly dish. If you have type 2 diabetes, pre-diabetes or are just trying to adopt a healthy diet, here are 10 simple ingredient substitutions that cut fat, sugar and calories, but don’t skimp out on flavor.

Ingredient Swaps

  • Use one-third of the sugar called for in a recipe. Instead of using the whole amount, add in a teaspoon of cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla, or almond extract to replace the sweetness.
  • Instead of using sugar in a recipe, replace it completely with a natural sugar such as Truvia, which is made from the leaves of the stevia plant.
  • Cut back on the total amount of fat in a recipe by up to one-half by substituting olive oil or coconut oil instead of butter. Also, be sure to only use a low-fat cooking spray to coat pans of baking sheets.
  • Replace all of the oil in a baking recipe with pureed fruit like unsweetened applesauce.
  • If you have a recipe that calls for cheese, using those with strong flavors allow you to use less without cutting down on how the dish should taste.
  • Instead of using a whole egg in a recipe with a quarter cup of egg substitute or two egg whites.
  • Substitute almond, soy and low-fat milk for whole milk.
  • When cooking stock and soup, allow them to cool and skim off the fat at the top. If you are using store bought versions, purchase low-sodium or sodium-free options.
  • Only use whole-wheat flour, whole-wheat pasta and brown rice.
  • Work in fresh vegetables whenever you can. Add broccoli to macaroni and cheese, and put garden veggies in pasta sauce. Try to avoid using canned veggies, since they contain high amounts of sodium.

 

 Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

When it comes to type 2 diabetes, the goal is always prevention. With diabetes affecting more than 26 million Americans and quickly growing, it’s more important than ever to know your personal risk factors:

  • Family History
  • Race (African Americans, Hispanics, Pacific Islanders, American Indians, Alaska Natives and Asian Americans are at an increased risk)
  • Being Overweight
  • Physical Inactivity
  • Low HDL cholesterol
  • High blood pressure
  • Abnormal fasting glucose screening results

If you have any of these risk factors, or are above the age of 45, it is recommended that you have a blood glucose screening once every three years.




Healthy Recipe: Oven-Baked Salmon

November 5, 2014

Wild salmon is one of the best types of fish to include in your diet, and it can be done in a variety of ways. It’s firm enough to grill, but it’s just as delicious baked, and doesn’t dry out as easily as many other fish. It comes fresh, frozen, smoked, and canned. Wild salmon can be eaten without fear of excess contaminants or mercury, and it has a very high nutrient profile, including the highly-prized omega-3 fatty acids. What’s not to like?

Click the title of the recipe to access the preparation instructions.

 

Oven-Baked Salmon

• 12 ounce salmon filet, cut into 4 pieces
• Coarse-grained salt
• Freshly ground black pepper

Try pairing the salmon with a toasted almond parsley salsa and baked squash. Here’s what you’ll need for the salsa:

• 1 shallot
• 1 tablespoon of red wine vinegar
• Coarse grain salt
• 2 tablespoons of capers, rinsed
• 1 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley
• ½ cup toasted almonds
• Extra-virgin olive oil

The omega-3s found in wild salmon help reduce your risk for heart disease, which is important for those who have type 2 diabetes, since their risk is already elevated. Over time, high blood glucose levels can lead to an increase in fatty material deposits in blood vessels which contributes to clogging of the arteries.

Salmon also contains a healthy fat and protein combination that slows your body’s absorption of carbohydrates, which keeps blood sugars on a more even level.

Here are a few health benefits of eating salmon:

Reduce inflammation – Omega-3s from fish reduce the inflammation in blood vessels characteristic of heart disease and diabetes
Lower Triglycerides – Omega-3s lower blood triglycerides (fats) and boost the amount of HDL or “good” cholesterol. These changes are especially favorable in people with heart disease and type 2 diabetes.
Help prevent obesity – Diets rich in seafood omega-3s may reduce fat tissue
Manage blood glucose levels – fish is a lean, high-protein food that doesn’t raise blood glucose levels.

 

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

When it comes to type 2 diabetes, the goal is always prevention. While eating right and following a regular exercise routine help, there are risk factors that you have less control over.

• Family History
• Race (African Americans, Hispanics, Pacific Islanders, American Indians, Alaska Natives and Asian Americans are at an increased risk)
• Low HDL cholesterol
• High blood pressure
• Abnormal fasting glucose screening results

If you have any of these risk factors, or are above the age of 45, it is recommended that you have a blood glucose screening once every three years.




Your Guide to Health Screenings

October 30, 2014

You take care of the filter in your furnace, getting the oil changed in your car, but do you pay enough attention to your most important machine – your body?

Regular checkups and screenings are keys to early detection and successful treatment of serious health conditions. However, remembering what to get checked for and when can be difficult. So we’ve put together a list of basic and essential health screenings that you should schedule with a healthcare provider, along with the basics on why you need them.

 

Health Screenings

Eye Exam: This is necessary for everyone about once every two years. The American Optometric Association recommends an eye exam once every 2-3 for ages 19-40, once every 1-2 years for ages 41-60, and once every year after that.

Dental Exam: Another obvious screening, but sometimes it’s easy to forget to make your appointment once every 6 to 12 months. It’s important for your dentist to examine not only your teeth, but to check for gum disease, oral cancer, and issues with your bite.

Blood Pressure Screening: Recommended for everyone age 18 and older, once a year. Screening for high blood pressure is simple, yet important. High blood pressure increases the risk for stroke, heart failure, heart attack and kidney damage.

Pap Test/Pelvic Exam: Pelvic exams and pap tests detect cancerous and pre-cancerous changes in the cervix, and recommended for women ages 21 to 65 once every three years. The frequency of screenings may be reduced by your health care provider bases on your results.

High Cholesterol Screening: Recommended for adults starting at the age of 20, and rescreenings should occur once every five years. Detecting and managing high cholesterol is extremely important. High cholesterol can cause plaque build-up in artery walls, raising the risk for atherosclerosis. Based on your health history, your health care provider make screenings more often.

Mammogram: New screening guidelines call for women of average-risk to be screened once every 2 years starting at age 50 to age 75, to detect breast cancer.

Diabetes: Screening for type 2 diabetes is recommended for anyone over the age of 45, or adults with blood pressure higher than 135/80. The screening checks fasting levels of blood glucose. Individuals who have high cholesterol, obesity, and family history should be screened more often.

Colon and Rectal Cancer Screenings: Colorectal cancer screenings are recommended for everyone of average risk starting at age 50. Studies show that regular screenings improve survival rates and reduce the number of CRC-related deaths. If you have family history, your doctor may recommend a different testing or screening schedule.

Prostate Cancer Screening:  A prostate cancer screening is recommended once a year for men starting at age 50, and earlier for patients at a high risk. Screenings detect high levels of prostate-specific antigen which may indicate prostate cancer.

Bone Density Test: Bone density screenings are used to detect osteoporosis and are recommended for women ages 65 and older, once a year, unless they are at high risk. Screenings are used to detect loss of bone density and mass which can help in early detection and treatment.

Heart Disease Screening: Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Heart disease screenings measure risk factors such as high cholesterol, C-reactive protein levels, glucose levels and high blood pressure.

 

Life Line Screening

At Life Line Screening, our mission is to make people aware of unrecognized health problems and encourage them to seek follow-up care with their personal physician. We are the leading provider of community-based preventive health screenings in the United States. We use advanced ultrasound equipment (the same as the equipment found in hospitals) and highly trained healthcare professionals perform our screenings. Board-certified physicians review each result to ensure the highest standards.

Since our inception in 1993, we have screened nearly eight million people, and currently screen nearly one million people each year at over 16,000 screening events nationwide. Through this experience, we often identify serious health issues and have helped save thousands of lives. We are dedicated to providing the highest quality preventive screenings at affordable rates.




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