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Posts Tagged ‘healthy eating’

Healthy Recipe: Prosciutto Wrapped Chicken with Marsala Sauce

February 23, 2015

Paper-thin slices of prosciutto are turned into a salty, crispy “crust” in this quick chicken thigh recipe with mushroom sauce that serves two. Serve with mashed potatoes and steamed greens.
 

Prosciutto-Wrapped Chicken with Marsala Sauce

  • 4 large boneless, skinless chicken thighs (about 1 1/4 pounds), trimmed
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper, divided
  • 4 thin slices prosciutto (about 2 ounces)
  • 4 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1 large shallot, halved and thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh oregano plus 1 teaspoon, divided
  • 8 ounces sliced cremini mushrooms
  • 1/2 cup Marsala (see Tip) or dry sherry
  • 1 cup reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch

 

Preparation

  1. Sprinkle chicken thighs with 1/4 teaspoon pepper and wrap each with a slice of prosciutto.
  2. Heat 2 teaspoons oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add the chicken and cook, turning once, until browned on both sides and cooked through, 4 to 5 minutes per side. Transfer to a plate; tent with foil to keep warm.
  3. Reduce heat to medium and add the remaining 2 teaspoons oil, shallot and 1 tablespoon oregano to the pan. Cook, stirring, until the shallot is beginning to brown, 1 to 2 minutes. Add mushrooms and cook, stirring, until browned in spots, 4 to 6 minutes. Add Marsala (or sherry), return heat to medium-high and cook 2 minutes.
  4. Whisk broth, cornstarch and the remaining 1/4 teaspoon pepper in a measuring cup; add to the pan, stirring. Return to a simmer and cook, stirring constantly, until the sauce is thickened and glossy, about 4 minutes. Serve the chicken with the mushroom sauce, sprinkled with the remaining 1 teaspoon oregano.

 

Tips & Notes

  • Tip: Marsala, a fortified wine from Sicily, is a flavorful addition to many sauces. Don’t use the “cooking Marsala” sold in many supermarkets—it can be surprisingly high in sodium. Instead, purchase Marsala that’s sold with other fortified wines in your wine or liquor store. An opened bottle can be stored in a cool, dry place for months.

 

Nutrition

Per serving: 310 calories; 15 g fat (3 g sat, 7 g mono); 87 mg cholesterol; 10 g carbohydrates; 0 g added sugars; 28 g protein; 0 g fiber; 588 mg sodium; 513 mg potassium.

Nutrition Bonus: Zinc (19% daily value)

Carbohydrate Servings: 1/2

Exchanges: 1/2 vegetables, 3 1/2 lean meat, 1 fat

© Meredith Corporation. All rights reserved. Used with permission




Healthy Recipe: Asparagus Topped with Creamy Tarragon Sauce

February 13, 2015

This sauce is like a luscious, creamy bearnaise sauce without all the calories and fat.
 

Asparagus Topped with Creamy Tarragon Sauce

  • 2 bunches asparagus, tough ends trimmed
  • 1/2 cup low-fat plain yogurt
  • 6 tablespoons reduced-fat mayonnaise
  • 4 teaspoons chopped fresh tarragon, or 1 teaspoon dried
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice, juice
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • Salt & freshly ground pepper, to taste

 

Preparation

  1. Bring 1 inch of water to a boil in a large saucepan. Put asparagus in a steamer basket, cover and steam until tender-crisp, about 4 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, whisk yogurt, mayonnaise, tarragon, lemon juice, water, mustard, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Drizzle the sauce over the asparagus. Serve warm or cold.

 

Tips & Notes

Make Ahead Tip: Cover and refrigerate the sauce for up to 3 days.
 

Nutrition

Per serving: 114 calories; 7 g fat (1 g sat, 2 g mono); 8 mg cholesterol; 10 g carbohydrates; 0 g added sugars; 4 g protein; 2 g fiber; 350 mg sodium; 336 mg potassium.

Nutrition Bonus: Folate (42% daily value), Vitamin A (25% dv).

Carbohydrate Servings: 1/2

Exchanges: 1 vegetable, 1/2 fat

© Meredith Corporation. All rights reserved. Used with permission




Healthy Recipe: Papaya & Chile Chocolate Bark

February 6, 2015

With just a few simple steps, you can transform plain chocolate into a divine treat with this chocolate bark recipe. We stir dried papaya, pepitas and chile powder into this chocolate bark, which is perfect for a gift.
 

Papaya & Chile Chocolate Bark

  • 2 cups chopped bittersweet or semisweet chocolate (or chips)
  • 1/3 cup pepitas (see Tip), toasted
  • 1/3 cup finely chopped dried papaya
  • 1 teaspoon ancho or New Mexico chile powder, divided

 

Preparation

  1. Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil. (Take care to avoid wrinkles.)
  2. Place chocolate in a medium microwave-safe bowl; microwave on Medium for 1 minute. Stir, then continue microwaving on Medium, stirring every 20 seconds, until melted. (Alternatively, place in the top of a double boiler over hot, but not boiling, water. Stir until melted.)
  3. Combine pepitas and papaya in a small bowl. Stir half of the mixture along with 1/2 teaspoon chile powder into the melted chocolate. Scrape the chocolate onto the foil and spread it into a 9-inch square. Sprinkle with the remaining pepitas, papaya and chile powder, pressing any large bits in. Refrigerate until set, about 30 minutes.
  4. Transfer the bark and foil to a cutting board. Use a sharp knife to cut into 1 1/2-inch pieces.

 

Tips & Notes

  • Make Ahead Tip: Refrigerate airtight for up to 2 weeks.
  • Tip: Hulled pumpkin seeds, also known as pepitas, are green seeds with a delicate nutty flavor. They are sold raw, salted and/or roasted, and can be found in the natural-foods section of many supermarkets and natural-foods stores.

 

Nutrition Information

Per piece: 48 calories; 3 g fat (2 g sat, 0 g mono); 0 mg cholesterol; 7 g carbohydrates; 3 g added sugars; 1 g protein; 1 g fiber; 2 mg sodium; 6 mg potassium.

Carbohydrate Servings: 1/2

Exchanges: 1/2 other carbohydrate, 1/2 fat

© Meredith Corporation. All rights reserved. Used with permission




Healthy Recipe: Almond & Lemon Crusted Fish with Spinach

January 30, 2015

Coating fish with nuts and baking it is an easy, foolproof way to cook it elegantly. And it is especially nice with a mild white fish like cod or halibut. The spinach turns a little yellowy because it’s cooked with the acidic lemon juice, but what you lose in green color is more than made up for in great flavor.
 

Almond & Lemon Crusted Fish with Spinach

  • Zest and juice of 1 lemon, divided
  • 1/2 cup sliced almonds, coarsely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh dill or 1 teaspoon dried
  • 1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 1 1/4 pounds cod (see Tip) or halibut, cut into 4 portions
  • 4 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 2 cloves garlic, slivered
  • 1 pound baby spinach
  • Lemon wedges for garnish

 

 Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F. Coat a rimmed baking sheet with cooking spray.
  2. Combine lemon zest, almonds, dill, 1 tablespoon oil, 1/2 teaspoon salt and pepper in a small bowl. Place fish on the prepared baking sheet and spread each portion with 1 teaspoon mustard. Divide the almond mixture among the portions, pressing it onto the mustard.
  3. Bake the fish until opaque in the center, about 7 to 9 minutes, depending on thickness.
  4. Meanwhile, heat the remaining 2 teaspoons oil in a Dutch oven over medium heat. Add garlic and cook, stirring, until fragrant but not brown, about 30 seconds. Stir in spinach, lemon juice and the remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt; season with pepper. Cook, stirring often, until the spinach is just wilted, 2 to 4 minutes. Cover to keep warm. Serve the fish with the spinach and lemon wedges, if desired.

 

Nutrition Information

Per serving: 249 calories; 13 g fat (1 g sat, 8 g mono); 46 mg cholesterol; 8 g carbohydrates; 0 g added sugars; 28 g protein; 4 g fiber; 496 mg sodium; 1025 mg potassium.

Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin A (184% daily value), Vitamin C (37% dv), Folate (36% dv), Magnesium (35% dv), Potassium (29% dv), Iron (22% dv), Calcium (17% dv)

Carbohydrate Servings: 1/2

Exchanges: 1 vegetable, 3 lean meat, 2 fat

© Meredith Corporation. All rights reserved. Used with permission




Healthy Recipe: Smoky Maple-Mustard Salmon

January 20, 2015

It doesn’t get much easier—or more delicious—than this speedy recipe for roast salmon topped with a smoky maple-mustard sauce. The sweetness of the maple balances the tangy mustard; smoked paprika or ground chipotle adds another layer of flavor. Ask at the fish counter to have the salmon cut into four 4-ounce fillets with the skin removed. Serve with roasted green beans and whole-wheat couscous tossed with pecans and chives.
 

Smoky Maple-Mustard Salmon – click here for the full recipe

  • 3 tablespoons whole-grain or Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon pure maple syrup
  • 1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika or ground chipotle pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 4 4-ounce skinless center-cut wild-caught salmon fillets

 

Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Heart Health

 
If you want a healthy heart, be sure to include plenty of fish in your diet. Fish plays a protective role against heart disease and cancer that’s attributed to Omega-3 fish oil, which is found in Alaska salmon. Here are a few health benefits:

  • Protect heart health
  • Reduce risk of sudden death from heart disease
  • Reduce risk of stroke
  • Reduce chance of heart disease in Type 2 Diabetes
  • Essential in infant brain and eye development during pregnancy and infancy
  • Improve blood lipid patterns
  • Improve blood vessel function
  • Improve symptoms of immune and inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, Chrone’s disease and some skin conditions
  • Reduce the risk of some mental disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and depression

 

Protect Your Heart for a Healthy Future

 
At Life Line Screening, we believe that the power of prevention is essential to a long and healthy life, especially when it comes to your heart. We offer a heart disease screening that includes the following:

  • Complete Lipid Panel Screening (High Choelsterol)
  • C-reactive Protein Screening
  • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening
  • Glucose Screening
  • High Blood Pressure Screening

If you have any warning signs or if you know that you have some of the risk factors associated with an increased risk of heart problems, you may want to consider heart disease screening.  If you are unaware of potential risk factors please read the list here.

 




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