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Posts Tagged ‘stroke prevention’

Dangers of a High Salt Diet

September 11, 2014

Think you’ve managed to avoid salt in your diet? Think again. Even if you don’t sprinkle a little extra salt on your meals, it’s sneaking into your diet from other foods you eat.

According to the New England Journal of Medicine, consuming too much salt is responsible for 1.6 million cardiovascular-related deaths annually. The World Health Organization has a maximum of 2,000 mg of sodium per day, and when that limit is exceeded, the effects can be devastating.

 

What’s the Danger?

If you consume a large amount of sodium, it increases blood pressure which is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, mainly heart disease and stroke.

Many people eat more than twice as much salt as they should, with the average person in the United States eating around 3.95g of sodium each day. In the U.S. alone, around 58,000 cardiovascular deaths each year can be attributed to a high sodium intake.

 

Cut Your Intake to Reduce Your Risk

So if you aren’t dumping salt onto your plate, where does the sodium come from? Around 75% of the excess sodium consumed comes from processed and pre-prepared foods. Canned soups, rice mixes and frozen pizzas can have up to 1,000 mg of salt per serving, which is half of the daily recommended intake.

Going out to eat can also be a dangerous game. Restaurant meals can have more than enough salt in them to account for the whole day’s recommended intake.

Your best bet? Eating home cooked meals with fresh ingredients. Fill your diet with wholesome foods like low-fat dairy, lean protein, fruits, vegetables and legumes. Use plenty of fresh herbs and spices instead of salt to add in extra flavor.

 

Reducing Your Risk for Cardiovascular Disease

While avoiding salt can help reduce your risk for developing cardiovascular disease, there are other risk factors that you can modify. Be sure to follow a regular exercise routine, quit smoking, and lowering high cholesterol are just a few.

Other risk factors can’t be changed including gender, age and family history. At Life Line Screening, we offer preventive health screenings to individuals who do not present symptoms of a disease, but may be at risk simply due to age and family history. Learn more about our screening options that can help you assess your personal risk for cardiovascular disease including stroke and heart disease.




Stroke Dangers in the ER

May 15, 2014

Stroke affects 795,000 per year in the United States, meaning that one person has a stroke every 40 seconds. While 88% of stroke patients do not get a warning, research from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore says that early warning signs of stroke are being missed by doctors in the emergency room for those who do get a warning.

 

How Strokes Are Misdiagnosed

12.7% of patients treated for stroke were originally misdiagnosed by the physician in the ER and returned later. Doctors confused early warning signs with other, less threatening conditions. Headaches and dizziness are symptoms of stroke, but also ear infections and migraines.

Based on this study, researchers believe that anywhere from 50,000 to 100,000 people are injured by a misdiagnosed stroke each year. However, certain factors seem to increase the risk of being misdiagnosed in the study:

• Women were 33% more likely to have a misdiagnosis
• Minorities were 20-30% more likely to have symptoms ignored
• Patients under age 45 had the highest risk

 

How You Can Detect Stroke

The more you know, the better off you are. Detecting a stroke early or before it happens give the patient the best chance at a full recovery. Early warning signs for stroke include:

• Numbness/Weakness of Extremities
• Confusion
• Blurred Vision
• Dizziness
• Loss of Balance
• Severe Headache
• Difficulty Speaking
• Face Drooping

Certain risk factors for stroke are preventable, other are determined by family history, race, age and gender.

Concerned about your risk for stroke? Annual stroke screenings are recommended for anyone over age 50, or if you have risk factors, age 40. We offer five screenings to help you understand your personal risk. Schedule your preventive stroke screening with us online today.




Win a FREE Stroke Screening During National Stroke Awareness Month

May 1, 2014

Today is the first day of May, so at Life Line Screening we are kicking off National Stroke Awareness Month in a BIG way.

Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States, making it a serious condition. Studies show that almost 80% of all strokes are preventable and nearly 85% of all strokes that occur show NO warning signs.

So to promote National Stroke Awareness Month and to raise awareness, we are giving away five stroke screenings for FREE. Want to increase your chances of winning? Share the infographic below,  follow us on social media and refer a friend – you’ll earn extra chances to win a free stroke screening package. Winners will be announced in June.
a Rafflecopter giveaway




High Blood Pressure and Stroke Risk

April 24, 2014

A new study conducted by a research team shows that even blood pressure that is slightly higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as high blood pressure, can increase the risk for stroke.

Normal blood pressure is 120/80 mmHg and the threshold for high blood pressure is 140/90 mmHg. Blood pressure numbers that reside in between the two can have a negative impact on health.

 

Blood Pressure Study

Nineteen studies involving more than 19,000 participants were conducted to study the effects of blood pressure and stroke. The findings of the study showed that participants who had what was classified as prehypertension were 66% more like likely to have a stroke when compared to those with a normal blood pressure. In addition, close to 20% of strokes that occurred over the course of the study were suffered by participants who had prehypertension.

The section of participants who had prehypertension were classified into two different groups, high (130/85 mmHg) and low (lower than the high but above the norm). Those in the high group were 95% more likely to suffer a stroke than those with normal blood pressure. Participants with low prehypertension were 44% more likely to have a stroke than those with blood pressure at normal levels.

 

Blood Pressure and Stroke Prevention

The Center for Disease Control states that 1 in 3 Americans have prehypertension, so not only preventing stroke but also prehypertension is extremely important.

The best way to prevent high blood pressure is by following a healthy diet and exercise plan. Following a diet that is high in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, as well as being low in saturated fats and cholesterol has the ability to lower blood pressure by as much as 14mmHg.

The same goes for preventing stroke, since high blood pressure, high cholesterol, physical inactivity, obesity and poor diet are all risk factors.

If you are worried about high blood pressure and stroke we offer health screenings for both. Check our stroke page and high blood pressure page  for more information on who should get a screening, how often they should be performed, and a full list of risk factors.  




Vitamin C is Linked to a Reduced Stroke Risk

March 27, 2014

A new study links vitamin C to a reduced stroke risk. The study compared patients who had experienced a hemorrhagic stroke with healthy counterparts.

All of the participants had blood tests that checked their vitamin C levels. 41% of all participants had normal levels, 45% were at a depleted level and 14% were so low that they were labeled as vitamin C deficient. After comparing the blood test results to which patients experienced a stroke, it was found that patients who suffered a stroke had depleted levels of vitamin C.

Doctors who took part in the study believe that vitamin C may reduce stroke risk by reducing blood pressure. Other added benefits of the vitamin include protection against immune system deficiencies, eye disease, cardiovascular disease and it assists in making collagen which gives structure to skin, bones and tissue.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, with over 130,000 deaths per year. It is recommended that individuals over the age of 55 with risk factors should have a stroke screening.

 

Preventive Health Measures

There are several risk factors that increase your risk of stroke:

  • Age (75% of all strokes happen to individuals over the age of 65)
  • Family history of stroke
  • High blood pressure
  • Heart disease
  • Diabetes
  • Smoking
  • Heavy alcohol consumption
  • Poor diet
  • High cholesterol levels
  • Physical inactivity
  • Head and neck injuries
  • Drug abuse
  • Gender
  • Race
  • Being overweight or obese

If you have any of these risk factors, schedule a stroke screening with us online. We offer five different types of stroke screenings to help you better understand your risk. Take advantage of the power of prevention today.




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